Menu
header photo

Project Vision 21

Transforming lives, renewing minds

Blog Search

Blog Archive

Comments

There are currently no blog comments.

Individual and collective immaturity prevent us from solving our problems

Francisco Miraval

I have been observing people and myself for many years and I honestly believe there are to main reasons why we, humans, face the problems and challenges we face: either we are not living the life we have been called to live according to our talents and passion, or we never assume our responsibility for the problems we have.

Obviously, things are not that superficial. In fact, every minute of every day we are bombarded by messages telling us we are living the “wrong” life and we should aspire to a “better” life. And in many cases, people in a position of authority (from teachers to politicians) become examples of those who easily and rapidly find somebody else to blame for whatever is happening to them or for the results of their actions.

Even worst, that “better life” constantly being presented to us and exemplified by the so-called “celebrities” is, no doubt, just an illusion where many live trapped all their lives. I mean, as soon as you move beyond the red carpet and the altered pictures, the glamour disappear and the misery of the real life many “celebrities” live is evident, as many stories show.

We are asked to buy cars, makeup, perfumes, vacations, watches, electronics, clothes, and running shoes so we can look like the human caricatures, the masks, the fiction character, the mental illusions presented to us to deceive our minds and hearts and, in doing so, lead us away from our purpose and mission in life.

We become the other to ourselves because we compare ourselves to an ideal that we will never reach because it doesn’t exist. We are frustrated for not reaching that “better life” which in many cases it is just a mirage, not a real thing.

And then, in frustration, we look for a scapegoat to explain our problems. And the list of our scapegoats includes everything and everybody, from our parents to God, and anything else in between. “They” (whoever they are) are responsible for our problems, not us. They should be blamed, not us.

There are, obviously, circumstances beyond the control of any individual and even of humans in general. Yet, we live at a time when we don’t assume any responsibility, either as an individual or as a collective society. The “other” (the predecessor, the opposition, the boss or supervisor, the husband or wife, the mechanic, the doctor) are responsible. We are blameless.

And such an immature approach to life is openly promoted at schools, churches, community organizations, and any other place where the system remains unaware of itself and, therefore, scapegoats are needed and created. (For a list of scapegoats, read the well-known by Bertolt Brecht.)

Carl Jung said that you don’t solve your problems: you outgrown them. In think that means you need to reconnect with your true self, so you can find your call and destiny in life. Yet, you can only doing it looking inside yourself with a mind, heart, and will open to transformation.

Go Back

Comment